REDD funded by the oil industry cannot be “sustainable development”. Norwegian oil company Equinor continues its climate masquerade

As climate breakdown gets worse, the corporations most responsible are looking for ways to continue profiting from ever increasing greenhouse gas emissions. Norway’s oil company Equinor is a classic example of this. The company plans to continue drilling oil – including in the Arctic – while investing in “natural climate solutions” to offset its emissions.

Continue reading

Oil, climate change, and Patricia Espinosa’s short memory

Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC, was in Weimar, Germany this week. In her first speech since COP 24, she said that the UN climate meeting in Katowice reached an “extremely successful outcome”. Of course Espinosa doesn’t mean that the meeting was successful in addressing climate change. She just means that it was successful in continuing the never-ending farce of the UN climate negotiations.

Continue reading

Carbonballs: “Norwegians should not have a guilty conscience about flying,” says Erik Solheim, not long before being forced to resign as head of UNEP for running up a ridiculously huge carbon footprint

REDD-Monitor’s occasional series, Carbonballs features the climate howlers made by so-called environmental leaders. Today’s post features Erik Solheim, who resigned this week as head of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

Continue reading

Norwegian oil giant Equinor’s plans to burn the planet and buy REDD offsets praised by UNFCCC executive secretary Patricia Espinosa

On 20 November 2018, Equinor, one of the largest oil and gas firms in the world, wrote to Patricia Espinosa, the Executive Secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. The first sentence spells trouble. “The way you lead the important work to deliver solutions to the global climate challenge is of great inspiration to us,” Equinor’s CEO Eldar Sætre writes.

Continue reading

REDD is “no silver bullet”, admits Ola Elvestuen Norway’s Minister of Climate and Environment

Last month saw the Oslo Tropical Forest Forum 2018, 10 years after REDD was included in the Bali Road Map, at the UN climate negotiations in December 2007. “The goal of the forum is to celebrate results and identify remaining challenges,” according to the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation’s website about the event.

Continue reading

Guest Post: Norwegian climate policy affects the poorest

Hanne Svarstad and Tor A. Benjaminsen have been carrying out research into REDD in Tanzania for several years. Svarstad is a political ecologist, sociologist and professor in Development Studies at Oslo Metropolitan University. Benjaminsen is a human geographer and professor of Development Studies at the Department of International Environment and Development Studies (Noragric), Norwegian University of Life Sciences.

Continue reading

Norway’s Office of the Auditor General investigation into Norway’s rainforest billions: “Progress and results delayed, uncertain feasibility and effect, risk of fraud not well managed”

Over the past ten years, Norway has handed out almost US$3 billion (NOK 23.5 billion) on stopping tropical deforestation. On 15 May 2018, the Office of the Auditor General completed its investigation into Norway’s International Climate and Forest Initiative. The report is critical.

Continue reading

REDD myth no. 4: REDD will be quick and cheap

In December 2007, Norway’s then-prime minister Jens Stoltenberg launched Norway’s International Climate and Forest Initiative (NICFI). Stoltenberg announced that Norway would be handing out more than US$500 million a year “to prevent deforestation in developing countries”. Stoltenberg was convinced that stopping deforestation would be quick and cheap.

Continue reading